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Fuseta closer to Nature, Algarve, Portugal

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Fuseta closer to Nature, Algarve, Portugal

Fuseta is a perfect location to combine birdwatching and some quiet beach time.

Fuseta is a small village by the sea and marshlands where you can do some birdwatching in the Algarve.

Is still a generally forgotten destination when planning to visit the Algarve but it shouldn’t be.

When at Fuseta you can visit Armona Island, a white-sand island with cristal clear waters.

One of the local attractions is the “ria” (1) and all the sea-life you can enjoy when taking a boat tour there.

I enjoy visiting the “Moinho das Marés” (2), a local lodging with direct access to the marshlands.

By being lodged there you have access to the area where flamingos spend most of their life.

You can get close enough to the flamingo’s to photograph even not being a nature or birds photographer with expensive gear.

There are other birds than flamingos although I’m not an expert to tell you their names.

The lodging itself is quite nice. Simple, functional, clean and it will cover more than your basic needs.

Mosquitos will be an issue because you are surrounded by water.

However, in the rooms, you will be safe because they have mosquito nets on the windows.

Anyway, I will suggest you have bugs spray when you go outside especially during sunset.

All in all, is a wonderful place to stay.

Have fun,

David Monteiro

(1) Ria: is like river (rio in Portuguese) but with seawater.

(2) Moinho das Marés: the translation for “moinho de maré” is tide mill, Moinho das Marés is the name of the lodging and it refers to an old tide mill existing at the place.

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Photography tour in Lisbon

Photography in Lisbon, I can assist you.

If you want to do some photography in Lisbon, I can assist you. Let me know about your photography style.

If you are really interested in doing some photography in Lisbon, time is a constraint and valuable asset for you.

You may have already an idea of what do you want to photograph or you may need some assistance, in both cases, I can help you.

This tour is not a fixed tour but a flexible one because it depends on your interests.

In case you don’t know exactly what do you want, it will depend on what we can agree to do.

I will have some suggestions for you based on my own experience and knowledge but in the end, it will be your decision.

In this website I will progressively publish some of my photos but please do not take them as the photos I want you to take.

My photos are only ideas of angles or subjects.

Naturally, in case you want to take those shots, I will be pleased to assist you, obviously.

Check my photography tour here.

David Monteiro

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How to divide the time to spend nine days visiting the Azores?

Lagoa do Fogo (Fogo Lagoon) in São Miguel Island, Azores, Portugal

How to divide the time to spend nine days visiting the Azores?

Where to go and how much time to spend on each island?

You want to spend some time in the Azores but you don’t know where to go.

Let me try to help.

The Azores is an archipelago of the Portuguese territory constituted by nine islands.

These islands are organized into three groups accordingly with their relative position and proximity: Oriental Group, Central Group, and Occidental Group.

Oriental Group: Santa Maria Island and São Miguel Island

Central Group: Pico Island, São Jorge Island, Faial Island, Graciosa Island, and Terceira Island

Occidental Group: Flores Island and Corvo Island.

Check the Azores location in Google Maps here.

In spite of the Azores being part of Portugal, the archipelago is totally different from the mainland.

Is far from sufficient to say that you will find there a unique environment. Is like visiting a different country but with the same language.

In between the several Azorean islands you will also find huge differences.

While some islands are green, with dozens of lakes and waterfalls, other islands will give you dark landscapes colors with impressive mountains.

These differences between islands are not only in the landscape but also in their traditions and ways of being.

At São Miguel island you will find a considerable size island, all green and quite exuberant, with an architecture based on black and white buildings.

On the other hand, just as an example, Pico island is dark and dry because of the volcanic dark stone.

At Pico, the locals love to paint their dark stone houses doors with red color and the result is fantastic.

With nine islands and also considering the difficulties of access to some of them, is almost impossible to visit them all in one week, at least it doesn’t worth your while to do it like that.

If you’re planning a one week tour, or 9 days for that matter, you will need to make choices regarding what islands to visit.

In this post, I will focus on a 9 days tour.

Later I will write another post considering a two weeks tour and these two possibilities will be very different.

Naturally, the answer will depend on your personal preferences.

However, in case you are more willing to go trekking the answer will be to go visiting islands like Flores or São Jorge.

If you are more of a general tourist maybe plan to spend more time at São Miguel and Terceira.

For the sake of the explanation I will divide the people that are interested in visiting the Azores in two big groups knowing that I’m taking the chance of leaving many possibilities out of this division:

Relaxed Group – Those that are more like a general tourist. Want some cultural activities, not too deep, some walks, not too far or not taking too much time, take some pictures, have some relaxation moments but get to know the place.

Active Group – Those that are interested in knowing the place while doing some physical activities like walking, maybe trekking, or scuba diving, photography, sea kayaking, etc, although are also interested in getting to know the place.

Note that, things like local food and wine tasting, getting to know people and some relaxing are included in both groups, naturally.

I know that splitting the people into two groups like this is probably not even fair but this is a blog post, not a scientific study … give me a break.

So, the question is now “How to divide the time to spend nine days visiting the Azores?”

Please bear in mind that I don’t like to travel with too much tide schedules or be all day long rushing.

I also need to feel that I’m making the most of my time in a balanced way.

What is good for me is not necessarily the best for you so you will do your own decisions.

Relaxed Group: mix tour with some cultural activities, some photo opportunities, and some walks:

3 days at São Miguel island

2 days at Pico island

1 day at São Jorge island

3 days at Terceira island

Active Group: plenty of opportunities for walking, scuba diving, serious photography, surf, rock climbing, etc – two possibilities:

3 days at São Miguel island

2 days at Pico island

2 days at São Jorge island

2 days at Terceira island

or

3 days at São Miguel island

3 days at Flores island

2 days at Pico island

1 day at São Jorge Island

This is only an idea of how to split time between islands, you will decide what is best for you.

The Azores is in my shortlist of favorite destinations

I’ve been traveling there for many years and I know deeply all the islands.

There are infinite possibilities to do a wide variety of activities like walking, photographing, lay down on the beach, jumping from cliffs, cultural visits, you name it.

Is really difficult to select some islands to visit in one week, leaving out so many other wonderful places but this is real life with its limitations of time and money.

In this post, I did not consider the logistic difficulties you can find when booking flights to the Azores.

It will always depend on where do you come from. 

Later I will write a series of posts regarding each island and with some ideas of what can be done here.

You also have the possibility of joining us on our tour here.

Have fun,

David Monteiro

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The Garrano Horse at Gerês National Park, Portugal

Garrano horses at Peneda-Gerês National Park, Portugal

The Garrano Horse at Gerês National Park, Portugal

Wild horses in Portugal at Gerês National Park.

Why are the Garrano horses so important?

In a territory with such ancient boundaries, such as Portugal, and where the human presence is almost everywhere, there are not so frequent wildlife sightings.

When these sightings happen, as it was in this case, it is always an exciting moment.

Garrano is a breed of Iberian horses.

We often tend to refer to Garrano horses as being Portuguese but the fact is the animal knows no boundaries and they can be seen both on the Portuguese side and on the Spanish side.

On the Spanish side, the Gerês (Gerês National Park) is called Xures, very similar.

These are horses of small stature, wrongly often referred to as ponies, adapted to the harsh conditions of the Gerês and with working horse characteristics.

It’s difficult to find the word to express how much I love seeing these free animals in the wild.

They are no longer in danger of extinction as once they were, it is a sign of hope in the future of coexistence between humans and wildlife.

This was a moment to remember.

David Monteiro

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How to visit Lisbon in one day?

Are you planning to visit Lisbon in one day?

I will leave here my suggestions on how to divide the time during a one-day visit to Lisbon and the best way to structure my suggestions is to divide the visit in morning, afternoon and after dinner.

You know the answer: that is impossible. However, what to do when a day is all the time we have to get to know Lisbon? Of course, we will have to make the most of the available time.

I will leave here my suggestions on how to divide the time during a one-day visit to the city and the best way to structure my suggestions is to divide the visit in morning, afternoon and after dinner.

JOIN ME FOR A TOUR

In this post, I will not include meals or lodgings because I will write about hotels and restaurants later.

Morning

– One monument visit: Jerónimos Monastery – this monastery is classified as UNESCO World Heritage Site, was built by King Manuel I in 1502 and it took about 100 years to be built. Is the maximum exponent of Manueline architecture, also known as the Portuguese Baroque.

– One tasting: Pastéis de Belém – as a result of the Liberal Revolution of 1820, in 1834 the convents and monasteries were closed. Was in this context that someone went to a sugar refinery close to the Jerónimos Monastery and put a few cookies on sale, these cookies are today known as the “Pastéis de Belém” and they must be the better worldwide known Portuguese sweets.

– The first walk: Baixa and Chiado – are two typical neighborhoods of the city and good representatives of the society of 18th and 19th centuries. Start by the view from the Viewpoint of São Pedro de Alcântara and walk downhill until the Camões Square and after this walk along the Garrett Street and end at Rossio. It is certainly a beautiful journey through Portuguese Romanticism and also a good opportunity to visit Baixa (downtown), the neighborhood that was built after the great earthquake of 1755.

Please check: Lisbon walking tour map – 1 of 2

– The second walk: Alfama and São Jorge Castle – Alfama is a medieval district and has been inhabited since the foundation of the city so it is here that we can find the oldest buildings in the city. Walking through the narrow streets of Alfama and observing its inhabitants is to know the typical Lisbon. Start your walk at the São Jorge castle and hence find the Miradouro das Portas do Sol from where we can see the roofs of Alfama, the quarter where we will walk until Terreiro do Paço.

Please check: Lisbon walking tour map – 2 of 2

Note: using a city map will help you making sense of all these names I’m mentioning.

Afternoon

Having walked in the morning, for the afternoon I will suggest more cultural moments for the afternoon, so I will propose a Museum and the Oceanarium visits.

– Museum of the City: it was easy to propose a visit to the Museum of Ancient Art (Museu de Arte Antiga), which is the most common suggestion you will find in terms of visits to museums. However, I believe this Museum, being an excellent Museum, does not offer something unique to those visiting Lisbon, here you will find excellent pieces that could be in any major European Museum but not necessarily Portuguese pieces. So I will propose a visit to the City Museum, a small museum, whose collection is not something extraordinary but has the particularity of being a very nice space and the collection is Portuguese, this is a truly Portuguese space.

– Oceanarium: is the second largest aquarium in the world which is by itself a sign of being something that you can hardly see elsewhere and has an extensive collection of marine creatures. It is located at Parque das Nações, which is an ideal area for a late afternoon beer and to end the active day.

After dinner

The visit to the city will not be complete without a stroll through the area of nightlife where you can have a drink and hear some music.

Of course, there are several areas in the city where this may happen but without complicating too much the explanation I would say that is in the Bairro Alto where you can find more diversity of bars.

Personally, I love bar “Pavilhão Chinês” (Chinese Pavilion), one of the most beautiful bars I know.

JOIN ME FOR A TOUR

Have fun in Lisbon.

David Monteiro

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Accessing to the right photo spots for photography in Lisbon

Accessing the right photo spots for photography in Lisbon

For a travel photographer, accessing the right spots for photography is often a problem for many reasons, and in Lisbon it is not different.

It starts by needing to know where are the best spots for your photography style and how to get there but is it doesn’t end here.

Depending on your photography style you might want to access areas where it can be more fruitful to be accompanied by a local.

Being for safety reasons or just because a guide can take you to where you will be mingling with the local folks away from the touristic areas, using this kind of services is a possibility to consider.

Situations that one takes for granted at home can be very different in another town or country.

A simple example is considering Lisbon to be an interesting city to photograph fishing boast just because it stands by the sea. Perhaps it is but where to do it and when are questions to consider.

Also, there is the “time” constraint factor to think about. So many places to go and so little time available.

As a local photographer, I’m offering tours for photographers depending on their specific or general interests.

If you are spending a couple of days in Lisbon or in the surroundings as you may well know, that is not too much time to photograph so you better take the most of it.

Give me a call and let me know what kind of assistance you might need.

Check my photography tour here.

David Monteiro

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Unknown places to walk – the river Alva dams

Unknown places to walk - the river Alva dams

The river Alva starts in the southwestern part of the Serra da Estrela and goes into the Mondego River upstream of Penacova, around 230km north from Lisbon.

At the mouth of the river Alva, and near Penacova, there are a number of small dams that allow a very interesting walk where we can cross the river several times from one side to the other, as we can see in the photographs of the various walks I led there.

With a good knowledge of the region, it is possible to predict the level of water passing over the dams in such a way that it becomes possible to do the crossings without taking your boots off.

 An unknown location, which does not come in tourist guides but well worth a visit and the hiking is fabulous, especially if it’s finished with a typical regional dinner with dishes such as “Chanfana” or a Lamprey Rice. I will write about these dishes later.

Let’s walk?

I will be expecting you.

David Monteiro

Originally posted 2015-12-28 12:37:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Walking to Cape Roca, Europe’s mainland westernmost

Cape Roca
Cape Roca

Have you ever walked to Cape Roca, Europe's mainland westernmost point?

Walking to Cape Roca is a way to prepare my guests for mountain walking tours.

Walking from Guincho to Cape Roca is one of the classic walking trails in Lisbon/Sintra area.

Quite close to Cascais, at Guincho, you will find some trails along the seacoast.

Walking these trails you will have the sensation of “I’m at the end of Europe”.

In fact, you are at the westernmost point of Europe mainland, the Cape Roca (38°46’49.59″N 9°29’56.19″W).

From the Cape Roca, or arriving here, you can walk many different trails.

I am going to focus on only one, from Forte do Guincho to Cape Roca, means from East to West.

North from Guincho, at Abano beach, you can find an XVII century fortress named Forte do Guincho.

This is one of several Portuguese military fortresses built after the revolution of Dec’1640.

An interesting flower to look for and to care for, around here, is the Armeria pseudarmeria.

This species is at risk of extinction both because tourists pick them up due to its beauty during blooming and because it only grows along these cliffs.

Granite is the king of the area.

It offers us magnificent cliffs often with more than 150m/492ft (+/-) high and with standalone rocks.

Some of these rocks look like guardians of the coast, always searching for the enemy boats at the horizon.

The sunsets at the west so one can take amazing sunset photos from the Cape Roca or very impressive photographs of the waves hitting the rocks.​

Map-Guincho-Cape-Roca

I usually come here with Portuguese guests before mountain hiking tours.

The trail is wonderful as a pre mountian tour preparation.

Have fun,

David Monteiro

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Walking the Douro Valley – Portugal

Walk the Douro Valley trails and paths, Portugal

Walking along the river Douro – Portugal

The Douro Valley is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and walking along the river Douro is a unique experience.

From the belvedere of São Salvador do Mundo (Saint Savior of the World), we can see a huge portion of river Douro.

The Belvedere is at 493 m high (1617 feet) at the top of a long slope.

At the top, you can see both river bank’s completely filled with vineyards.

Port wine and table Douro wine are produced here.

Looking around, the river dominates the landscape. Is like a long snake on its way to the ocean.

Almost all we can see from here are steep shores with vineyards.

Is there something else besides vineyards?

In the few little spaces that man is not be able to extract wine from the land, proud olive trees will be found whose fruit will produce one of the best Portuguese olive oils, the Douro Valley olive oil.

In addition to the olive trees, the almond trees stand out in number and, the closer we get to Pocinho, the almond trees become more numerous.

Is in the Algarve and Trás-os-Montes regions where there is a greater abundance of almond trees in Portugal.

The Douro train line.

This is an overwhelming location.

From this high point, a huge number of other summits can be spotted. There are countless mountains around here, spread as far as the human eye can reach.

Down the steep slope, very close to the river, the train slips through the railways. It looks like a toy.

It’s hard to distinguish the train and sometimes it seems like a caterpillar being swallowed by the landscape.

In fact, the train is going into some tunnels existing along the railway.

When the train passes, it always causes for joy and excitement.

I love to imagine what the people inside the train think about the group of walkers who apparently are in the middle of nowhere.

The train stations are perfect locations for brief stops, to eat a snack, and we can also admire the hand-painted tiles.

Porto São Bento, Pinhão and Pocinho are the train stations where you can see wonderful hand-painted tiles.

If you want to know more about the train ride please access here.

About the walks.

You can find many different kinds of walks.

Some of them are quite easy, on paved surfaces,  with wide-open views, as you can see in one or another photo here.

But the walks to the highest points are not easy, especially if you lack training but with some patience and walking slowly you will overcome the strong inclination of the trails.

In the end, at the top of the hill, you will finally get the reward for the effort by looking to these wide landscapes.

I prefer to walk during the first hours of the day.

It’s usually quite pleasant with a cold breeze and even some fog on the water.

Photo opportunities.

The river water condenses in the air, leaving a very slight mist. It gives a mystical ambiance to the Sunrise complementing this idyllic setting.

This is gold for photography lovers.

I can also say that this is a paradise for landscape photography with all sorts of angles.

The weather.

During summer months is very hot.

As the day progresses it starts to get warm reaching 40º C (104ºF) or higher during the summer.

However, early Spring or during the Fall one can have very nice weather.

When walking down towards the river, we will notice an increase in temperature, especially at a half hillside.

We understand why these grapes ripen so early in the season and we understand how life can be so hard around here for those who are harvesting vines.

A large part of these grapes are harvested by hand and, during harvesting season, there are numerous teams of people hired from everywhere to participate in the harvest.

What kinds of wine can we get here?

Port wine and table wine from the Douro region.

In another post, I will detail a bit more matters concerned with the port wine, the wine production, and the harvesting.

What about hand-painted tiles?

There is a long tradition of hand-painted tiles in Portugal and we can find impressive tile works in these train stations.

The train stations of Pinhão and Pocinho are the most impressive, hand-painted tiles wise.

When to visit the Douro Valley?

Between April and the end of May and between mid-September to late October the Douro Valley is just perfect to visit and to walk around.

Anyway, there is no one time better than the other, there are different seasons and with very different scenarios, although this is my favorite months.

Visiting the Douro Valley in September/October you will see the end of the harvesting season. The vines have dark red leaves and the scenario is an impressive spectacle of shades of red and one can take amazing photographs.

The grapes harvesting is probably the most important time of the year and all around you can see people carrying baskets of grapes in a huge frenzy.

What else to do in the Douro Valley?

This is a wine region so wine tastings are to be expected.

If you are at Pinhão, the heart of the Douro Valley, you can try one of the many farms with wine tastings.

Is also a good opportunity to earn more about Port wine and its differences versus still wines.

Suggestion: you can try Quinta do Bomfim for a wine cellar visit.

Enjoying one of the several upscale lodgings is an experience that worth the cost.

A suggestion: Quinta Nova Nossa Senhora do Carmo

In a landscape dominated by the River, the hike could not finish better than with an excellent ride on a Rabelo boat.

The Rabelo boat is the wooden typical boat of the Douro River that was once used to transport the barrels of wine to Vila Nova de Gaia, in front of Porto.

From Vila Nova de Gaia, the wine was then shipped to the rest of the world.

The river waters are usually calm and the Rabelo boat, with its wide hull, is a very stable and comfortable vessel, sailing toward the mouth, to the West.

Ahead of us, the sunset is the end of a fabulous day, a treasure to save.

Suggestion: Magnífico Douro Wooden Rabelo Boats for a boat ride.

Check our tour to the Dour Valley here.

David Monteiro

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Walking in Ervamoira wine farm – Portugal

Walking in Ervamoira, a wine farm in the Douro Valley, Portugal where they produce Port wine and table wine.

It'spectacular and unexpected to see a planted vineyard where is so warm and so dry that only olive, almond, and fig trees could grow and nothing else can.

The merit belongs to Ramos Pinto the famous Portuguese winemakers.

José Ramos Pinto was looking for a more flat estate to able to have a mechanized vineyard structure and found this estate that, at that time was called Quinta de Santa Maria.

The farm was “re” baptized as Ervamoira, like the book from Suzanne Chantal.

This is one of the warmer and drier areas in Portugal so you may want to avoid the summer months because it will be too hot to walk. During winter it can also be too cold … extreme temperatures, very characteristic of inland regions of the northeast regions.

This area, called Fôz Côa, is quite known due to an impressive set of prehistoric drawings. In case you want to visit the engravings, you will need to go to the Tourist Office at Vila Nova de Foz Côa and get a guided visit.

Remember, above all this is a wine region so taste the wonderful wines you can find here, both table wines and Port wine. I tasted (several times) their white Port wine and is delicious.

A special thanks to Sónia Teixeira the official guide of the Ervamoira and a lovely host.
From Chãs to Ervamoira’s premises is a 7,5 Km walk with 390 m descent (blue line of the map) and from Ervamoira’s premises until Chãs is a 9 Km walk with 375 m ascent (red line of the map), taking into account that you might want to see the engravings in the meantime.

Enjoy yourself.

David Monteiro